Frank Tirrill ~ A Civil War Veteran

A brief history of a Civil War Veteran taken from the Lodi Enterprise – 1932:

"Frank Tirrill, Civil War Veteran, Passes His 91st Birthday"

Way up in the northwest corner of the state of New Hampshire, according to the recollection of a Lodi townsman, there was born on May 24th, 1841, to Timothy and (Mary Drew) Tirrill, a son who was given the name, Frank. He was the fifth of nine children and the second son.

The birthplace of Mr. Tirrill was in the upper Connecticut valley at a place called Stewartstown. This village is in Coos county, about 30 miles from Fourth Lake, the source of the big, beautiful river which forms the boundary line between the granite state and its sister, Vermont, and but a few miles from the Canadian border.

Mr. Tirrill’s father was a blacksmith in the beautiful village in the northern foothills of the White mountains studded with a chain of lakes — the Connecticut lakes — First, Second, Third and fourth, by designation. He served ……. as sheriff…………….when the family reached the new western state they sought for a home. Even so this locality did not hold these north New Hampshire people for more than a year, for Timothy Tirrill moved to West Point where the family became residents on the farm now owned by John Mahlke. Here they commenced to live, the mother passing on in April, ’67.

In the meantime the subject of this sketch had established his own home, the wife being Miss Angeline Shaw of Merrimack. They had been wed on the 2d of September, 1860, and the purchase of the Tirrill estate had been the next important event in young Frank’s life. Their first child, (Myra), became the wife of Richard Collins, and was an infant when Mr. Tirrill on February 4, 1864, enlisted and at Camp Randall became a member of Co. H, 49th regiment. He was advanced from private to corporal during the little more than a year he was in service. Their second child, another daughter, Belle, is in the father’s home.

From Camp Randall, Mr. Tirrill’s regiment was ordered to St. Louis, from where detachments were sent into outlying districts to capture bushwhackers.

The young soldier came out of the service with a record of having captured three of these troublesome confederate soldiers to be taken before the provost marshal. "And the amazing thing," Mr. Tirrill said, to The Enterprise interviewer, "of the 33 we captured from irregular confederate troops and which so much more reduced the guerilla warfare in the wooded hills and mountains of this vicinity, only two could write their names; and this writing more nearly resembled turkey tracks than hand writing." Mr. Tirrill’s company was stationed at Rolla, Missouri, at the close of the fighting. It was at this place the word was flashed to the 49th Wisconsin on the morning of April 15 that their president had been assassinated.

Our soldier boy, Tirrill, was one of the Johnnies who came marching home again without the scars of war; nor had he engaged in a real battle. But he was a veteran of the great Civil War and as such became a member of the great post war organization, The Grand Army of the Republic. In this organization he served as an officer at different times.

The Frank Tirrill family moved from the West Point farm located on what is now highway 60, to the village in 1874, and Mr. Tirrill followed the business of contractor and builder. Mrs. Tirrill passed on in 1915 and since that time Miss Tirrill has deboted herself to the care of the home and the aging father’s welfare. Mr. Tirrill enjoys working about his home and for further recreation keeps in touch with all the events of the day through the privilege of reading. He says there are very few of the Wisconsin veterans whome he once knew now living; but he recalled Charles Lang of Madison, and George B. Watkins of Baraboo.

Mr. Tirrill cast his first vote for president in the second Lincoln campaign. He has been a republican throughout his life, and is of the old line; and when he goes to the polls this fall it will be to help elect the seventeenth U.S. chief executive since he came into his majority.

Frank Tirrill – Obituary  -  April 1935

Frank Tirrill native of New Hampshire where he was born in May 1841; a resident of Wisconsin since 1850, first on Sauk Prairie near Prairie du Sac, and later of the town of West Point, and of Lodi village since 1871, passed away on Thursday, April 11, 1935, lacking but a few weeks of being 94 years old. His death maybe said to be due to the infirmities of age, as he had been gradually failing in strength during the past four years.

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The funeral was held from the Masonic temple Saturday afternoon. The Revs. A. R. Henry and J. W. MacElree conducted the services at the temple, where L. C. Haberman, W. R. Steele, D. C. Fellows and V. P. Langler, comprising the Masonic quartette, sang with Mrs. Grace Brainard accompanist. The Masonic services of commitment were performed at Mt. Pleasant cemetery with BV. P. Langler in charge of the ritual. The pall bearers were Harry G. Drew, Walter E. Bartholomew, Charles W. Chrisler, L. E. Gesell, H. L. Hering, and Nels Thompson. Military honors were given by the American Legion firing squad and by Boy Scouts Bobby Goeres and Gordon Tucker as buglers.

The passing of Mr. Tirrill leaves Charles Loper, now 88 years old, as the only surviving member of the Grand Army of the Republic in Lodi.

Mr. Tirrill’s birthplace in New Hampshire was Stewartstown. His parents were Timothy and Mary Drew Tirrill. Frank was the fifth of nine children and the second son. When he was 10 years old the family came to Wisconsin and settled first near Prairie du Sac, and later moved to the town of West Point to the farm now owned and occupied by John Mahlke.

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On Sept. 2, 1860, Mr. Tirrill married Angeline R. Shaw of Merrimack. In February, 1864, Mr. Tirrill enlisted at Camp Randall and became a member of Co. H, 49th Wis. regiment, and left to serve his country, leaving at home the young wife and the first born daughter. he served a little more than a year and was advanced from a private to the rank of corporal. Mr Tirrill’s regiment was ordered to St. Louis, from where detachments were sent into outlying districts to capture bushwhackers. Mr Tirrill earned the record of having captured three of these troublesome confederate soldiers.

At the time of his 92nd birthday, in 1933, The Enterprise published a sketch of him, in which the interviewer said: "It was at Rolla, MO., that the word was flashed to the 49th Wisconsin on the morning of April 15 that the president had been assassinated…" Our soldier boy, Tirrill, was one of the Johnies who came marching home again without the scars of war; nor had he engaged in a real battle. But he was a veteran of the great Civil War and as such became a member of the great post war organization, the Grand Army of the Republic. In this organization he has served as a officer at different times.

Mr. Tirrill and family gave up farm life in 1871 and came to Lodi village where he followed the business of contractor and builder for many years.

Mr. and Mrs Tirrill had two daughters – Myra, who became the wife of Richard L. Collins, and who passed on in December 1923, and Belle, who was a school teacher for years, then librarian of Lodi Public library for some years, and retired to administer to her aging father. Mrs Tirrill died at the age of 70 in April, 1915 – just 20 years preceding her husband. Both Mr. and Mrs. Tirrill were prime movers in the organization of the Woman’s Relief Corps in Lodi – No. 1, the first Corps in the state of Wisconsin.

Mr. Tirrill was a member of the Masonic and Eastern Star lodges for many years. He was also a loyal Modern Woodman, and did a great deal for that order here in the days of his activity.

Besides the daughter, Belle, Mr. Tirrill is survived by one sister, Mrs. Mary Shumway; by three grand-daughters, Mrs. Walter E. Evert, Mrs. Robert Storie, and Mrs. Cecil Cook; and two great-grandchildren, Miriam Cook, and Robert Storie jr.; a niece Mrs. L. Rosenthal, Lodi; a nephew, Fred Shumway, Janesville, and others.
Out of town people attending the funeral last Saturday were F. A. Shumway, Janesville; Paul Rosen and sons, Mr. and Mrs. Kris Kramer and son Frank, Madison; Mr. and Mrs. Simon Cobleigh, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Cobleigh and son, Reddsburg; Mrs. Will Premo, Baraboo.

Copyright (c) Lee Drew 2011-10-31 08:00:00
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