The Art of the Handcarved Gravestone

Most of us have visited the graves of our ancestors.  If they were buried long ago and lived in the eastern U.S., they probably had handcarved headstones.  I’ve enjoyed looking […]

Most of us have visited the graves of our ancestors.  If they were buried long ago and lived in the eastern U.S., they probably had handcarved headstones. 

I’ve enjoyed looking at the detail carved into their markers and have wondered at the symbols used on them.   Skulls, wings, death’s heads.  I understand the symbolism they represent but didn’t these self-professed Christians have any hope or expectation beyond these morbid representations of death? 

Sure they did.  A review of the history of the symbols has to be considered in concert with culture of the society. 

While the symbols on the stones are often similar, the identity of the carver Is witnessed in their individual styles.    How long did it take them to carve the stones?   What tools did they use?  Was the craft lost to sandblasting and digitally created templates?   No.  A few folks still have the old carving skills when they opt to spend them working on tombstones.

The Art of the Handcarved Gravestone
Copyright (c) Lee Drew 2012-05-22 08:00:00
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Family history research is a favored avenue of relaxation. It is a Sherlock-like activity that can continue almost anywhere at any time. By leveraging a lifetime involvement in technology, my research efforts have resulted in terabytes of ancestral data, earning me the moniker of Lineagekeeper. And yes - We are all related to Royalty.