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Colonel William Anderson

Male 1693 - Bef 1796  (103 years)


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  • Name Colonel William Anderson  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Title Colonel 
    Born 1693  , , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 7
    Gender Male 
    Census 1782  , Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Federal 
    Occupation , Hampshire, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    farmer 
    Died Bef 9 Apr 1796  Anderson's Bottom, Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10, 11
    Notes 
    • William Anderson, (Col.) of Scotland, an adherent of Prince James, son of James II; after the insurrection of 1715; fled in disguise to Virginia, and settled on the North Branch of the Potomac River in (now) Hampshire Co., West Virginia in a beautiful valley known to this day as the "Anderson Bottom".

      Colonel William Anderson was born in Scotland in 1693; died in Hampshire Co., Virginia in 1797 aged 104 years. He married in Hampshire Co., 1732, Rachel, who was born in Scotland.

      Col. William Anderson and his son "Thomas" joined Braddock's forces at Cumberland and served during the western campaign. Col. William, so it is stated, always wore Scots dress.

      William Anderson was found as a Private listed in Captain William Preston's Company of Rangers from 8 Jun 1757 - 4 May 1759 as authorized by an Act of the House of Burgesses.

      He owned in 1738, and prior thereto, several plantations in the Conegochiege manor, in Prince Georges's County, Maryland, one of which called Anderson's Delight, he sold to Dr. George Stewart of the city of Annapolis in 1739.

      He was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Chruch.

      From the book: Life and Letters of Judge Thomas J. Anderson and Wife:
      "William Anderson of Scotland, descended from a family of considerable prominence, born in the Highlands in 1693, implicated in the rising of 1715 in behalf of the Pretender, Prince James, son of James II, fled in disguise, after the cruel suppression of this incipient rebellion, through England to Virginia, where British loyalists of his views ever found a warm welcome."

      Marion, Ohio, Oct. 26, 1886.
      Mr. J. H. Anderson, Columbus, Ohio.

      My Dear Nephew:--

      I now undertake to give you some account of my ancestors. My Great-grandfather, William Anderson, was born in Scotland, in the year 1693 and died in Virginia in 1797. He was a friend of the Stuart dynasty, and joined the standard of Prince James, the Pretender, (as he was styled by some) son of James II, the deposed King of England.

      After the rising in 1715, he fled into England where he tarried awhile, and then made his way in disguise, I am told, to Virginia, where he had relatives. He went up the Potomac river till he came to a beautiful and fertile valley, or bottom, on the North Branch, and here he decided to settle. It has ever since been called the Anderson Bottom, and was afterward included within the boundaries of Hampshire County, Virginia. That was then a wild region, inhabited mainly by Indians, but there were a few French, and probably a few British subjects west of William Anderson's new home.

      He was strong and brave, and helped to protect the frontier settlements from murderous Indian foes. In "Braddock's defeat" (Braddock's engagement with the French and Indians near Fort Duquense) though beaten he fought bravely.

      He was the father of four children, two boys and two girls. One of his sons, William, was killed by the Indians in the mountains near home. One of his daughters married Captain William Henshaw, of Berkley County, Virginia, whose plantation was near Bunker Hill, on Mill Creek.

      I have forgotten the name of the husband of the other daughter, although I have often heard it. (In a subsequent letter he says her name was Sarah and that she married a Mr. Wilkins.)

      As he, William Anderson, was 104 years old at the time of his death he was a little childish, but at 80 he was as strong and active as ever. He brought a large amount of gold from Scotland, or it was afterward sent to him, and he was known to possess a great deal when he died, but after his death it could never be found.

      From the Silver Family Organization website:
      "He (William) owned in 1738 and prior thereto several plantations in the Conegochiege Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland, one of which, called Anderson's Delight, he sold to Dr. George Stewart of the city of Annapolis in 1739. It was soon after coming to the country that a rich and beautiful valley, far up the Potomac on the North Branch attracted his notice and on it he encamped and buit a hunting lodge. This valley has ever since been known as the Anderson Bottom. When Hampshire County, Virginia, was erected, it embraced the Anderson Bottom, which was only five miles from Fort Cumberland, constructed in 1754. William Anderson died on the Anderson Bottom in Hampshire County, Virginia."


      WILLIAM ANDERSON WILL
      Hampshire County, West Virginia
      Made 10 September 1786
      Proved 9 April 1796
      Hampshire County Wills; Box 1-200; #18

      In the Name of God Amen. I, William Anderson of Hampshire County and State of Virginia, farmer, being very weak in body but of perfect mind memory and understanding, and Mindful of my Mortality, do this Tenth day of September in the Year of our Lord one Thousand Seven hundred and Eighty Six, Make and publish this my last Will and (?testament) in the (?manner) following. First, I resign my Soul into the hands of Almighty God, hoping and believing a Remission of my Sins by the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ and my Body I commit to the Earth and desire to be decently and privately Buried at the discretion of my Executor and my Worldly Estate I give and devise as follows--

      First, I give and bequeath to my Dear Beloved Wife all my Moveable or Personal Estate--Consisting of one Horse, Cows, Calves, and Hogs, to her and for her own proper use forever--also all my household Furniture to her forever, also I give and bequeath to her for and during her Natural Life, my now dwelling house, out houses and all there appurtenances (?therewith) belonging . One half of the Orchards and its profits, my Lower Meadow and one Field adjoining my Upper Meadow Containing Ten acres of Tillable Land to and for her own use during her Natural Life.

      Next, I give and bequeath unto my five Daughters, Namely, Nancy, Rachel, Sarah, Catherine and Hannah, Each One Shilling Sterling. And Lastly, I Constitute Ordain make and appoint My Only Son Thomas Anderson my Sole Executor of this my Last Will and Testament all and Singular my Lands, Messuages and Tenements by him to be possessed and any (?--indecipherable lines) before to me (?--indecipherable) --Revoke and Disannull all and every other (?f----) and Bequests whatsoever by me in any Ways before bequeathed, Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be my Last Will and Testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal the day and Year before written---(?__illegible)
      (signed by mark) William X Anderson

      (----)
      declared by the Testator and for his last Will and Testament, in the
      presence of us, who, at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have Subscribed our Names
      as Witnesses thereto--
      Evan Gwynnes
      Henry Hains
      Arthur (?___) Ohara

      Attached document was Recorded and Examined and
      (Recorded in) Will Book 1-22; Page 26

      At a Court held for Hampshire County the 9th day of April 1796.
      This the last Will and Testament of William Anderson deceased was proved by the Oath of Arthur OHarra one of the Witnesses thereto and on the (?Motion) of Thomas Anderson the Executor therein named certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate thereof in due (?form) he having taken the Oath of (?___ Executor and together with Arthur O'Harra and John House his Securities entered into and Acknowledged a Bond in the penalty of three hundred pounds Conditioned as the Law directs And at a Court held for the said County the 11th day of June (?three weeks) following the said Will was further proved by the Oath of Evan Gwynies another Witness thereto and is ordered to be Recorded
      Test--
      AudWodrow

      Support provided by William Anderson to the Revolutionary War per Publick Claims:
      Wm. Anderson for provisions & forage for cattle drivers 1-5-7.
      William Anderson 86# flour 8s-7.



      This surname, meaning ?son of Andrew?, is prolific, being common in Lowland areas as well as in the north-east. The reason why this name arises in so many different locations is due to Scotland?s patronymic system and little can be shown to suggest descent from a common ancestor. Thirteenth-century records give the earliest instances of the name and by the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, several burghs were represented in parliament by Andersons. The Furman-Workman MS of 1566 includes arms for Anderson of that ilk, implying that a notable Anderson was recorded as representer of the clan, but identification has never been established. In Privy Council records (James Y 2nd April 1526), one James Anderson of Sterheuch was made Carrick Pursuivant of Arms and in this position at the Court of the Lord Lyon, not to have borne and used arms is hard to reconcile. It has been suggested that he, and Anderson of that Ilk, were one and the same. This James is claimed as ancestor o the Anderson of North family in Strathbogle, yet the present senior line remains unknown. In more recent times their crest of an oak tree Proper with the motto 'Stand Sure', has been tacitly accepted by the Andersons as their clansman?s crest badge. A Clan Anderson Society has been active for some years in North America and St Andrew?s Day. 1993 saw the foundation of The Anderson Association in the United Kingdom.


      Letter from Hiram H. Anderson to his nephew, James H. Anderson: "I do no know all the plantations my great-grandfather William Anderson owned, but I know he was vastly rich. He was married twice. His second wife, a Miss Barnett, wa a girl of seventeen, with whom he lived twenty-four years. At the time of his second marriage he was 80 years old. When he died he was 104, and his wife died the following year. I believe he had no children by the second marriage." "My great-great-grandfather William Anderson, acquired the Anderson Bottom plantation in Hampshire county Va., by patent from Thomas, Lord Fairfax. Besides his Maryland real estate, William owned a number of other tracts. William and his (first) wife Rachel, conveyed 100 acres of good land on new Creek, in Hampshire county, to John Baker, Nov. 9, 1772. William and his (second) wife Margaret conved Sept. 17, 1787, to James Malloy, 327 acres of choice land, situate on Gibbons and Crooked runin in said county. Thomas Anderson and Sarah his wife, conveyed Nov. 22, 1802, said 206 acres to Martin Shaffer. Thomas Anderson conveyed April 16, 1802, by deed of gift, 93 acres of the Anderson Bottom to his son James. Thomas Anderson conveyed Feb. 26, 1806, to Daniel Collins, all the Anderson Bottom land except said 93 acres. James Anderson and Priscilla his wife, conveyed February 26, 1806, to Daniel Collins said 93 acres. The deeds of conveyance and of said real estate, except of the Maryland property, are all of record in Romney, Hampshire county, W. Va. William Anderson obtained the most of his Virginia real estate from Lord Fairfax."


      *******************************************************

      William Anderson of Scotland descended from a family of prominence, born in the Highlands in 1693, implicated in the rising of 1715 in the behalf of the pretender, Prince James, son of James II., fled in disguise, after the cruel suppression of this incipient rebellion, through England to Virginia where British loyalties of his views ever found a warm welcome; it was not long after his arrival in Virginia until he received remittances with which he bought real property in Maryland and Virginia. He owned in 1738 and prior thereto several plantations in the Conegochiege Manor in Prince George's county, Maryland, one of which, called Anderson's Delight, he sold to Dr. George Stewart of the city of Annapolis in 1739. It was soon after coming to the country that a rich and beautiful valley, far up the Potomac, on the North Branch, attracted his notice and on it he encamped and built a hunting lodge. This valley has ever since been known as the Anderson Bottom. When Hampshire county, Virginia, was erected, it embraced the Anderson Bottom, which was only five miles from Fort Cumberland, constructed in 1754. William Anderson died on the Anderson Bottom in Hampshire county, Virginia."

      **********************************************

      Colonel William Anderson
      Men of West Virginia
      pg 75

      William Anderson, a Scotchman of good family, of property, and education. In his native country he stood by the Stuarts, and in 1715 befriended and fought for Prince James. Then he was forced to fly, and after wandering about England for some months, he concluded to reach Virginia, where he found many people of his way of thinking; relatives, and a permanent home. Very soon after his arrival in Virginia he became the owner of a farm that has ever since been known as the "Anderson Bottom". It is on the North Branch of the Potomac in Hampshire County, that was afterward formed, embracing this place. Fort Cumberland, five miles distant, was erected a good many years after Col. William Anderson's occupation of the bottom. This region was then for the most part a howling wilderness, and savage Indians were the principal human inhabitants. William Anderson was a soldier by nature, and brave, and in his efforts to protect the infant frontier settlements had many conflicts with the Indians. He and his son Thomas joined Braddock's force at Fort Cumberland, on their way to Fort Duquesne, near which they were destined to suffer a disastrous defeat. Col. William Anderson was somewhat eccentric with all his noble qualities. He always wore a Scotch style of dress; and when he died in 1797, at the age of 104, his heavy head of hair was perfectly black, his teeth sound and white, and his eyesight as good as ever, so that the could read without glasses. [3, 4, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]
    • (Research Notes)

      :Another possible spouse name is Mary Lauren. http://www.blueneptune.com/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/hinshaw/id?304

      My Notes for William Anderson--revised 14 July 2002 Sandy Paser

      The story of William Anderson Sr. begins in the Scottish Highlands in 1693. His life would be shaped by the events of Scottish history.

      The recorded history of Scotland begins in the 1st century A.D. when the Romans invaded Britain, calling southern Britain "Britannia." They were unable, however, to subdue the fierce tribes of the north, who they called "Picts" because they painted their bodies. To keep these tribes from invading Britannia, Emperor Hadrian had a massive wall built across the island from sea to sea. The wall divided the highlands from the lowlands. In the 5th century AD, Celtic immigrants from Ireland, called Scots, settled north of the Clyde. They were already Christians and soon converted the Picts to Christianity. In about the 10th century, the land came to be known as Scotland.

      After the Normans conquered England in 1066, many Anglo-Saxons from England settled in the Lowlands of Scotland, gradually adopting English ways. The lowlands of Scotland came increasingly under the power and influence of the English--a state that became more solidified with the intermarriages between Scotch and English royalty. It became clear that the intent of England was to rule both countries and to impose her own political and religions practices upon all of Scotland.

      In the spring of 1297, a young Scottish knight by the name of William Wallace became involved in a brawl with some English soldiers. With the help of a girl, he made his escape, but she was caught and put to death by the Sheriff of Lanark. Wallace then killed the Sheriff and became an outlaw. From this small beginning sprang the movement to drive the English out of Scotland. He had a series of major victories in a guerilla-type of warfare, but was caught in open battle against superior forces at Falkirk and was defeated. He avoided capture for seven years, but in 1305 was captured, taken to London and barbarously executed. During these seven years, King Edward's forces had ravaged Scotland. They thought with Wallace's death all resistance would end.

      However, during these years the resistance was growing in ways that was not visible. Among the Norman-descended nobles was one who would take up the Scottish Royal standard. In 1306, the year after Wallace's execution, Robert the Bruce had himself crowned King of Scots. Although King Edward executed many of Robert's allies, he was still able to raise a fierce army, and on 7 July 1307 they killed Edward I in battle at Burgh-on-Sands. His son, Edward II, did not carry on his father's war. However Bruce had a series of victories that finally led Edward II to strike back. On 24 June 1314, Edward and his army engaged Bruce at Bannock Burn, below Stirling Castle. There, Bruce inflicted a disastrous defeat on the superior English Forces. Edward II escaped to England. This was the last great battle, but it wasn't until 1328 that Edward III formally recognized Scotland's independence.

      From "A Concise History of Scotland," by Fitzroy Maclean, pg 66-68, a brief history of the Scottish Clans:

      "In the north-west of Scotland, beyond the Highland Line, life went on as it had for hundreds of years. Here, what happened the Anglicized Lowlands had very little relevance. In the Highlands, the hold of both Church and State was less important than loyalty to the Clan. In Gaelic, CLANN meant children. The chief was the father of his people. He had power of life and death over them (of which he made full use). And he commanded, by one means or another, absolute loyalty. His land, in a sense, was their land; their cattle were his cattle. His quarrels (and they were bloody and frequent) were their quarrels. In its essence, the clan was patriarchal rather than feudal, an ancient Celtic concept which bore but little relation to the more recent central monarchy, but had its origin rather in the early Norse and Irish kingdoms of the west, from whose kings and high kings the chiefs of most of the great clans traced their descent."

      "To the Highlander, land, cattle, and men to guard them were what mattered. The clan lands belonged by ancestral right to the chief and were sub-divided by him among the members of his family and the men of his clan. The cattle were the most prized possessions, the source of their livelihood and social standing and the source, too of unending strife. In time of war the chief and those of his own blood led the clan in battle and, when he sent out the fiery cross, it was the duty of the men of the clan to follow where he led. --He was both lawgiver and judge. All who bore their chief's name liked to believe themselves--and often were--descended, as he was, from the name-father of the clan."

      "Little wonder, then, that the great chiefs and chieftains of the north and north-west, surrounded by their loyal clansmen, should through the ages have paid but little heed to the pronouncements of kings or parliaments or officers of state from south of the Highland line."

      From "Anderson Clan" web sites. The following is from several sites:

      Clan Anderson is "Mac Ghille Anrais" in Gaelic. It's motto: "Stand Sure? The origin of the name: "Son of Andrew"

      The name of 'Son of Andrew' is widespread in Scotland in different forms. In the Highlands it was rendered as "Mac Andrew." In the lowlands it was more commonly "Anderson." They share the same Gaelic derivation of "Gilleaindreas" --literally, a servant of St. Andrew, Scotland's patron saint.

      It is claimed that the MacAndrews came to Badenoch from Moidart about 1400. The tales of the vengeance of "Ian beg MacAindrea" on cattle lifters who raided Badenoch may confirm this. The MacAndrews were part of the Confederation of Highland Clans, the Clan Chattan. They were renowned for their fighting qualities. The Highland Andersons were a Sept (family branch) of the Ross Clan, located mainly in the hills of northwest Scotland. In Gaelic, ros means promontory. From this the ancient Celtic O'Beolain Earls of Ross and the people take their name. They are known in the Highlands as "Clann Gille Aindrais"-- the Children of Andrew.

      The men of Clan Ross led by William, the third Earl, were in the battle at Bannockburn in 1314 under Robert the Bruce. Robert signed the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320, marking independence from England. His daughter, Margery married Walter the Steward, and had a son, Robert Steward I, whose son Robert II, continued the Steward line of the Scotch Monarchy. "Steward" became "Stewart" and finally "Stuart."

      Much of the strife between England and Scotland centered on religion, as England was unendingly determined to force her Episcopalian or Catholic religion upon the Scottish Presbyterians. "Our" William was an adherent of the "Jacobites"--those who supported the House of Stuart as the rightful Monarchs of Scotland. The Jacobites considered James the VII and his son, James the VIII to be the true Monarchs of Scotland. James the VI, son of Mary Queen of Scots, was brought up as a Presbyterian. When Queen Elizabeth of England died in 1603, James inherited the throne of England. This is an important point often missed--it was the Scottish King who took over the English throne, not the reverse. James VI was the King of England and Scotland from 1603-1625. In England he was called James the First. The two nations were thus united under a single king, but Scotland remained a separate state with its own parliament and government.

      James VI's son, Charles I, became the King from 1625-1649, following the Episcopal Church of England, and persistently trying to impose the Anglican religion on the Scots. He was a poor politician, however. In the tug-of-war between Presbyterian and Episcopal interests, he made enemies in both regions. The Scots took up arms against Charles I and supported Oliver Cromwell and the Puritans in their civil war. Cromwell defeated Charles I, and had him beheaded.

      Charles I had two sons, Charles II and James VII (called James II in England). Upon hearing of Charles' execution, the Scots immediately declared Charles II the King of Scotland--on the condition that he accept Presbyterianism and impose it upon England, also. However, Cromwell was in charge in England, and was not about to recognize Charles II, or this Presbyterian power play. Charles' Scottish troops were decimated by the English forces and in September 1651, he was forced to flee in disguise to France. He never saw Scotland again.

      Cromwell called himself the "Protector" rather than King, although his "Protectorate" would be hereditary. He tried to impose a constitutional, representative government, but the two Houses of Parliament fell into wrangling about their respective privileges and made little attempt to co-operate with the executive. Cromwell died 3 September 1658.

      Charles returned to England from his exile in France, taking the throne as Charles II. During Charles' exile, almost all of Scotland had been conquered and held in subjection by Cromwell. The Scots celebrated Charles' return with a feeling of renewed independence. However, Charles vested himself with absolute authority in both nations. He reinstalled the Episcopalian religion in England, and again repressed the Presbyterians of Scotland. Charles died in 1685.

      This event meant that his brother, James VII was the heir to the Scottish throne. James had also taken refuge in France during the Cromwellian era, and returned to England with his brother. In 1669, James announced his conversion to Catholicism. This caused considerable anxiety. Catholicism was associated with continued absolutism and intolerance.

      James was never crowned in Scotland. He never visited Scotland while he was king. Nevertheless, the Stuart hold over the northern Highlands was so strong that there was scarcely a complaint when on 10 February 1685; the Catholic James was proclaimed King. However, Scotland remained anti-Catholic, and the Catholics living in the country were a detested minority, subject to anti-Catholic laws. James began to pass decrees to force the "Tolerance" of Catholics in Scotland. They were freed to worship God as they wished. The same privilege was extended to Quakers and finally Presbyterians. Naturally, the Scotch did not oppose the king who had given them so much religious freedom. It was the English who drove James abroad in the winter of 1688. The English declared that he had relinquished the throne. His daughter, Mary and her husband William of Orange, establishing the reign of William and Mary, replaced him. But as far as the Scots were concerned, James was still the king. His supporters were called "Jacobites." James unsuccessfully plotted to win back the thrones, finally appealing to France for aid, but was rebuffed. James died in 1701, but he left a son, James VIII, to take up the cause.

      The Scots believed that William and Mary had been imposed on them by the English, and their "Act of 1707" which united the two nations was the child of this forced marriage. Thus Jacobitism became intertwined with Scottish nationalism. It became the cause of a downtrodden and exploited nation.

      James VIII, called "The Old Pretender" was living in France. The Jacobites made many attempts to recapture the throne. James made three attempts to return to Scotland, but each time was found out and rebuffed by the English navy. A full-scale Jacobite uprising took place in 1715. It was ill-timed and James arrived too late to provide the much needed figurehead.

      (Jacobitism was the dominant feature of Highland history for some 60 years. When the Jacobite clans at the head of the "Bonnie Prince Charlie's" army were finally destroyed on Culloden Field in April 1746, the traditional Highland culture perished with them.)

      "Our" William Anderson Sr. was 22 years old in 1715, when he participated in this ill-fated demonstration of his Scotch Highlander loyalty. He had been trained as a Highland warrior from childhood. These skills served him well as he made his way to western Virginia and then farther inland to the wilderness of the Ohio River Valleys. His friends smuggled him out of Scotland to London and then to Virginia. After his move to the North Branch of the Potomac, in about 1730, he was a part of the history of that region from the French and Indian Wars through and beyond the Revolutionary War. He knew George Washington, William H. Harrison, Daniel Boone, and the family of Thomas Jefferson. He was there before any of them. The Andersons predate the founding of the county. Two or three generations of Andersons were born on or near "Anderson's Bottom" in what is now Hampshire County, West Virginia.

      *From "Life and Letters of Judge Thomas J. Anderson and Wife," by James H. Anderson, Chapter 1:

      "(My father's great grandfather) William Anderson, of Scotland, descended from a family of considerable prominence. Born in the Highlands in 1693, implicated in the rising of 1715 in behalf of the pretender, Prince James, son of James II (of England; James VII of Scotland) he fled in disguise, after the cruel suppression of this incipient rebellion, through England to Virginia, where British loyalists of his views ever found a warm welcome. It was not long after his arrival in America, until he received remittances (?gold-from Scotland?) with which he bought real property in Maryland and Virginia. He owned, in 1738, and prior thereto, several plantations in the Conegochiege Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland, one of which was called Anderson's Delight. (Note: It was located near today's Sharpsburg, Frederick County, Maryland. Using the deeds and land descriptions, Jim Burrows plotted the exact location of Anderson's Delight. It was right in the middle of the Antietam battleground, and is part of the National Historic Monument today.) William sold this property to Dr. George Stewart of the city of Annapolis in 1739."

      "It was soon after coming to the country, that a rich and beautiful valley far up the Potomac on the North Branch attracted his notice, and on it he encamped and built a hunting lodge. This valley has ever since been known as The Anderson's Bottom. On the south rose Knobley Mountain, and the place included a part of the mountainside. When Hampshire County, Virginia, was erected, it embraced the Anderson Bottom which was only five miles from Fort Cumberland, constructed in 1754."

      When William Anderson came to this part of Virginia, it was a wild region, a wilderness, and its inhabitants were mostly Indians. His cabin was probably more remote from civilization, and farther west than any other Anglo Saxon pioneer's. The adventurous French, following the watercourses, early penetrated the interior of the region, and a few no doubt occupied wilds more distant from there, but be that as it may, civilization had not yet reached this far. His time here for years was mainly spent in the forest in which he took delight. During this period, he spent the greater portion of every year on this Maryland Plantation. (This disputed region was later attached to Virginia) He acquired the Anderson Bottom plantation in Hampshire County, Virginia by patent from Thomas, Lord Fairfax (7 July 1777).

      "He was a brave and burly man and gallantly defended the infant settlements that soon made an appearance near his new home, from the murderous incursions of the Indians. His military experience now was of use to him, for while earnestly striving to avoid conflict with the Indians, he was engaged in many. He recruited a company of soldiers in the Valley of Virginia, which joined General Braddock's army at Ft. Cumberland, in June 1755, and although disastrously defeated by the French and Indians near Ft. Du Quesne, (9 July 1755) these Virginians sustained their ancient reputation for valor.* In war, William Anderson was a good soldier; in peace a good citizen. He died on the Anderson Bottom, in Hampshire County, Virginia, in 1797, at the great age of 104. He died as he lived, a devout member of the Protestant Episcopal Church."

      (Note: William's will was submitted to Probate 9 April 1796. If his birth date was 1693, he was about 103 years old.)

      On page 17, William's great-grandson, Rev. Hiram H. Anderson reports that 80-year-old William Sr. married his second wife, a Miss Barnett, when she was seventeen. When he died he was 104 years old. She died the next year. There were no children by this second marriage.

      * From "Westward Expansion," by Billington, pg 124-128:

      In 1750, New France claimed all of the Lower Ohio Valley west of the Wabash River. English traders dominated the upper Ohio Valley. In between was a wilderness occupied by Indian tribes who were friendly toward France. Any expansion of either trading frontier would mean a clash. French Governor Duquesne planned to build a string of forts from Lake Erie to the Forks of the Ohio (Pittsburgh) to secure the Ohio country for France "for all time." A large part of this territory had been granted to Virginia by its Charter of 1609. In the Fall of 1753, Virginia's Scotch Governor Dinwiddie sent a small party under 21 year-old George Washington to tell the French that they were on Virginia territory. They were not impressed. Before the spring snow melted in the spring of 1754, Duquesne began erecting his Fort at the forks of the Ohio River. In January 1754, Dinwiddie also ordered a construction crew westward to build a fort at the same location. His army of 150 men under George Washington, designated to occupy the fort, did not start westward until April. The returning construction crew with the news that a large French force was already erecting a powerful fort, Fort Duquesne, at the Forks, met them. Washington decided to march against the French. He attacked and defeated a small French Scouting party, however, he knew that a retaliatory attack was sure to come. They threw up earthworks, called "Fort Necessity" just north of the Pennsylvania/Virginia border, and waited for the French. They were found on 3 July 1754, and were decisively defeated. The English were driven from the Ohio Valley, and the Seven Years French and Indian War had begun. (Ft. Duquesne was located at the site now occupied by Three Rivers Stadium.)

      "General Edward Braddock arrived from England to take charge of the meager army of two regiments of regulars. He divided his already small group into four parts, each to attack different forts. This strategy brought disaster to three of the four expeditions...

      "Braddock suffered the worst defeat himself. With three hundred ax men clearing the way, Braddock started for Fort Duquesne in early June, leading 1400 Redcoats, 450 Militiamen under Washington, and 50 Indian scouts. (William Anderson was among the Militiamen.) One of the wagoners was Daniel Boone. The large force moved slowly as streams were bridged and small hills leveled for supply wagons. Sixteen days later, when word reached the English that French reinforcements were on the way, Braddock decided to press on more rapidly with 1,200 men, leaving the artillery and supply trains to advance more slowly. On July 8, 1755, this well-equipped army with flags flying and bagpipes shrilling emerged on an open plain seven miles from its objective. 600 Frenchmen and 200 Indians, sent from Ft. Duquesne to delay the English awaited them. The two forces clashed at once, fighting in the open in the best European tradition of eighteenth-century warfare. With the first burst of fire, Braddock's advance column fell back as it should, but the main body of troops failed to halt and the two surged together in a scene of incredible confusion. The French seized the chance to occupy a hill and ravine on either side of the British, and from this natural cover poured a deadly fire into the struggling mass of redcoats. The retreat finally ordered by the mortally wounded Braddock turned into a rout. Of the 1900 men who started west with Braddock, only 500 returned unharmed to Ft. Cumberland." (The lands he cleared became known as "Braddock's Road." It ran from Ft. Cumberland to Ft. Pitt {Pittsburgh}, and later became the National Road.)

      Allan W. Eckert has the "inside" story of Braddock's death in "That Dark and Bloody River," pg lxi:

      "July 9, 1755...Even General Braddock was dead, but he had been shot by one of his own men rather than the enemy. An advocate of the traditional British method of battle--standing in fully exposed formation and firing at an army similarly arrayed against him--he simply could not adjust to a foe who fought from behind protective cover, as the Indians and Canadians did; nor would he tolerate such 'ungentlemanly' conduct in his own troops. When he spied one of his militia soldiers, Pvt. Edward Faucett, firing from behind a tree, he ordered the man to fight in the open as a proper soldier should. Pvt. Faucett refused, whereupon Braddock instantly struck him down with his sword. The militiaman's younger brother, Thomas, crouched behind another tree nearby, saw what Braddock had done, and in retaliation, promptly shot him in the back. Severely wounded, Braddock finally died on July 13. The remaining provincial soldiers continued fighting from under cover, and as a result, many survived who would otherwise have been killed. Colonel George Washington came through unscathed, (although three horses were shot out from under him). He had been recognized by Red Hawk. a Shawnee sub chief, during the battle. Red Hawk took direct aim at Washington 11 times, not realizing his rifle barrel had become slightly bent, and missed him every time. He finally determined that Washington was under the protection of the Great Spirit, and ceased his attempts."

      Among the survivors were William Anderson and his son, Thomas.

      From Olive McFarland's report, "Descendants of William Anderson of Anderson's Bottom, West Virginia," (LDS Film #940943 Item 14): "Colonel William Anderson married Rachel___ in... Virginia, in 1732. She was born in Scotland."

      "Colonel William Anderson and his son, Thomas, joined Braddock's forces at Cumberland and served during the western campaign. Col. William, so it is stated, always wore Scots dress."

      William Anderson Sr. settled on the North Branch of the Potomac River at a site called "Anderson's Bottom," just across the river from Cresaptown, Maryland. Before the French and Indian war broke out in 1755, the relationship of the frontier settlers with the various Indian nations was relatively peaceful. He probably engaged in hunting and farming to supply his own needs, and in trading with the Indians. He was apparently very happy in his solitude in his sanctuary that was well out of reach of unwanted visitors.

      From the "History of Mineral County," by the Mineral County Historical Society:
      "While white settlers came to the area as far back as the early 1700's, Early English possession of the territory that eventually becomes Mineral County is not clear as to dates and circumstances, but some consistency exists among historians as to the chief events."

      "Apparently, in 1664, Charles II granted the 'Northern Neck' to Thomas, Lord Culpepper. In 1688, James II made a new grant that gave Culpepper possession of all the lands between the Rappahanock and Potomac Rivers to their headwaters."

      "Culpepper's land went to his daughter Catherine and eventually passed on to her son, Thomas, Lord Fairfax who, in 1733 petitioned George I for a survey to determine its boundaries. In 1736, a surveying party of 6 men, under the leadership of Major William Mayo, was sent to explore Fairfax's territory. This first survey provided the first useful map of the region, and Mayo's journal provided most of the knowledge available to settlers who began breaking through the Blue Ridge into western Virginia territory about the same time. "However, the survey produced the first spark of controversy as the King's commissioners protested that no one man should be allowed to own so much land. Apparently, by Mayo's figures, Fairfax held a claim to over 5,000,000 acres of North America."

      "As settlement increased, so did the tension to Virginia's claim to the territory that would later become West Virginia's eastern panhandle and Maryland's claim to the same territory. Maryland held the older land grant as it was Charles I who, in 1632, granted Lord Baltimore all the land south of the Pennsylvania border to the Potomac River. Maryland had marked its territory as including all lands north of the Potomac River's South Branch."

      "In 1746, an expedition of 40 men spent 127 days mapping the region. Included among them was Peter Jefferson, the father of Thomas Jefferson. On 23 October 1746, they reached the head fountain of the North Branch of the Potomac, which marked the farthest extent of the Fairfax lands. They then planted the 'Fairfax Stone' to mark the point." (Note: This would be about where Anderson's Bottom was located.) However, Maryland continued to dispute the claim. In 1832, the matter was again investigated. Maryland persisted in her claims, and the issue finally ended up before the United States Supreme Court, which ruled in favor of (West) Virginia in 1910."

      "In 1748, Lord Fairfax sent another surveying party. Among the surveyors was a 16-year-old George Washington, who kept a journal of the expedition. Washington records that his party crossed the South Branch of the Potomac River at Colonel Cresap's (now Cresaptown, Maryland) and traveled to the head of Patterson's Creek. According to Washington, the area was already peopled with white settlers."

      "Throughout the various surveys and the arrival of settlers, the area underwent several name changes and divisions. Prior to 1738, Virginia's Orange County consisted of all the territory west of the Blue Ridge. In 1738, this area was divided into the two counties of Augusta and Frederick with Frederick encompassing the area later to become the eastern panhandle of West Virginia. In 1753, Frederick became Hampshire County; in 1787, Hampshire was divided into two counties with the southern half becoming Hardy County. Finally, in 1866, the western half of Hampshire County became Mineral County."

      "While early settlers had entered the area encompassed by Mineral County, the French and Indian War served to disrupt early settlement. The forts that were built provided focal points for the towns that would eventually make up present day Mineral County. Despite the efforts of Colonel George Washington to provide protection to the area, French and Indian invasions forced many settlers to flee or seek protection within or near the forts erected by the Virginia Regiment."

      William Anderson Sr. is in the "DAR Patriot Index, Centennial Edition", on page 62. It reports that he was born in 1693 in Scotland; died about 9 April 1794 in Virginia (Note probate date 1796) He married (1) Rachel___; (2) ___Barnett. His served as a "Patriot" in the Revolutionary War in Virginia.

      "Virginia Revolutionary Publick Claims," Vol II, pg 449 & 450 reports that William Anderson of Hampshire County provided food and forage for cattle drivers and 86 pounds of flour.

      He was an Ensign, serving under Captain John Smith in the Augusta County Militia in 1742. ("Virginia Colonial Soldiers," Militia Miscellany--Draper Manuscripts, pg 224--Family Tree Maker CD503)

      From "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia," by Sage and Jones, "Deeds, Leases, Mortgages:'

      19 November 1772, William Anderson (wife Rachel) of Hampshire County to John Baker (Lease and Release) 100 acres at New Creek. Recorded 10 November 1772. No Witnesses.

      18 May 1791, William Anderson Sr. of Hampshire County, to Thomas Anderson (son) by deed of gift, 187 acres in state of VIRGINIA; 52 adjoining acres in ALLEGANY COUNTY, MARYLAND; Recorded 13 October 1791. Witnesses: Joseph Mounts, Asa Mounts, William Anderson (?) Note; this property straddled the state lines)

      William, a soldier in Capt. William Preston's Company of Rangers from 1758 until 4 May 1759, was given a Warrant for 50 acres of land in Montgomery County in April 1780. In addition, on 22 March 1780, he was an assignee of Robert Ross and Ludowick Shadon, for a total of 250 acres in Augusta County.

      ("Virginia Colonial Soldiers," Bounty Land Warrants; pg 302-303; On Family Treemaker CD503--Virginia Colonial Records, 1600's-1700's) --Was this William Sr. or Jr.?

      (Note: In "Early Records of Hampshire Co, Virginia" there are 2 land sales by a William Anderson and wife, Margaret: On 17 Sep 1787and 22 July 1797.There are two places in "Life and Letters" where James H. Anderson refers to these deeds as belonging to William Anderson (1) and Margaret as his 2nd wife. There is a will for a William, with wife Margaret in "Hampshire Co Synopsis of Wills" pg 107. It was made 8 Dec 1810; Proved 19 June 1815. This must be the William in these deeds.--Relationship unknown)

      A summary of William's Will from "Early Records of Hampshire County, Virginia," Synopsis of Wills, pg 107: Will made 10 September 1786; Proved: 9 April 1796. It mentions a Wife, but she is not named. Six Children:
      Nancy*
      Rachel
      Sarah
      Catherine
      Hannah
      Thomas "my only son"
      Executor, Thomas Anderson
      Witnesses: Evan Gwynne; Henry Haines; Arthur O'Hara
      Securities by: Arthur O'Hara; John House

      *(Note: Daughter, Agnes/Ann is not named. The DAR reports that 6 women have been admitted under William Anderson--"All through daughter Nancy, also known as Ann and Agnes, who married William Henshaw."). Some reports say that William Anderson did not want his wife to marry the then poor William Henshaw. Later in life, William Henshaw became a large landowner and wealthy individual.
    Person ID I1443992  7_families
    Last Modified 5 Nov 2013 

    Family 1 Rachel Mary Lauren,   b. Abt 1697, , , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. , , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1731  Of, , , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Children 
    +1. Thomas Anderson,   b. 1733, Anderson's Bottom, Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1806, , Fairfield, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     2. Rachel Anderson,   b. Abt 1736, , Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Sarah Anderson,   b. Abt 1738, , , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Agnes Ann Anderson,   b. 1745, , Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jul 1806  (Age 61 years)
     5. William Anderson,   b. Abt 1747, , , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Killed By Indians, , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
    +6. Catherine Anderson,   b. 7 Dec 1748, Connoquenessing, Butler, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Feb 1834, , Muskingham, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     7. Hannah Anderson,   b. Abt 1750, , Hampshire, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2006 
    Family ID F523873  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Margaret Barnett,   b. Of, , , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married calc 1783  , , , Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2006 
    Family ID F523993  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1693 - , , Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Federal - 1782 - , Hampshire, Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - farmer - - , Hampshire, West Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - calc 1783 - , , , Virginia Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Bef 9 Apr 1796 - Anderson's Bottom, Hampshire, Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S234] Forshay Family, Marjorie Featheringill Waterfield, (Bowling Green, Ohio : M. Waterfield, c1990 #929.273 F772w v. 1), 28 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S877] Life and Letters of Judge Thomas J. Anderson, James H. (James House) Anderson, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940397 Item 4), 3 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S8333] Anderson - Silver Family Website, Silver Family Association, (Online ).

    4. [S8204] West Virginia, Hampshire, Romney - William Anderson Will, State of West Virginia, Hampshire County Clerk, (Made 10 September 1786. Proved 9 Apr 1796. Copy in posession of Lee Drew).

    5. [S8188] Descendants of William Anderson of Anderson's Bottom, W. Va., Olive I. McFarland, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940943, item 14), 940943, item 14., 1: William Anderson was born in Scotland. He died in 1797 in Hampshire Co., Virginia aged 104 years (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S8197] Letter - John Anderson to James H. Anderson - 26 Oct 1886, John Anderson, (26 Oct 1886 One of the few first person documents in existence relating to William and Thomas Anderson and their families.), http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?o., William Anderson was born in 1693 in Scotland (Reliability: 3).

    7. [S8196] Bruce, John of the Shenandoah, Violet Laverne Bruce, (Decorah, Iowa : Anundsen Pub. Co., c1987. Book #929.273 B83br), 929.273 B83br..

    8. [S8217] Virginia, Hampshire Co. - 1782 State Census, Virginia Hampshire County, (Family Tree Maker CD520), William Anderson (Reliability: 3).

    9. [S8188] Descendants of William Anderson of Anderson's Bottom, W. Va., Olive I. McFarland, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940943, item 14), 940943, item 14., 1: William Anderson was born in Scotland. He died in 1797 in Hampshire Co., Virginia aged 104 (Reliability: 3).

    10. [S877] Life and Letters of Judge Thomas J. Anderson, James H. (James House) Anderson, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940397 Item 4), 2: He died on the Anderson Bottom in Hampshire County, Virginia in 1797, at the great age of 104. (Reliability: 3).

    11. [S8197] Letter - John Anderson to James H. Anderson - 26 Oct 1886, John Anderson, (26 Oct 1886 One of the few first person documents in existence relating to William and Thomas Anderson and their families.), http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?o., ' ... died in Virginia in 1797. (Reliability: 3).

    12. [S8188] Descendants of William Anderson of Anderson's Bottom, W. Va., Olive I. McFarland, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940943, item 14), 940943, item 14., 1: William Anderson life story (Reliability: 3).

    13. [S877] Life and Letters of Judge Thomas J. Anderson, James H. (James House) Anderson, (Salt Lake City : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1973. Film #940397 Item 4), 1, 2, 17 (Reliability: 3).

    14. [S8197] Letter - John Anderson to James H. Anderson - 26 Oct 1886, John Anderson, (26 Oct 1886 One of the few first person documents in existence relating to William and Thomas Anderson and their families.), http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?o..

    15. [S8339] Virginia - Court records, Janice Luck Abercrombie, (Athens, Ga. : Iberian Pub. Co., c1992. Book #975.5 P28a v. 2), 975.5 P28a v. 2., 449, 450 (Reliability: 3).

    16. [S8262] West Virginia and Its People, Thomas Condit and Hu Maxwell, (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Co., 1913).

    17. [S8193] Anderson - Burrows website, Jim and Selma Burrows, (Online ).

    18. [S8197] Letter - John Anderson to James H. Anderson - 26 Oct 1886, John Anderson, (26 Oct 1886 One of the few first person documents in existence relating to William and Thomas Anderson and their families.), http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?o., The name of his second wife was Barnett, to whom he was married at the age of 80. (Reliability: 3).