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Abraham Davie Candy

Male 1801 - 1880  (78 years)


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  • Name Abraham Davie Candy 
    Born 26 Dec 1801  London, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Census East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1840 U.S. 
    • Candy, Abraham D.
      State: New York Year: 1840
      County: Suffolk Roll: M704_343
      Township: Easthampton Page: 106
    Census East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1850 U.S. 
    • Candy, Abraham D.
      State: New York Year: 1850
      County: Suffolk Roll: M432_602
      Township: Easthampton Page: 439
    Census East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    1860 U.S. 
    • State: NY Year: 1860
      County: Suffolk County
      Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
      Township: East Hampton
      Page: 550
      Database: NY 1860 Federal Census Index
    Died 9 Feb 1880 
    Buried East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Buried in the South End Cemetery at South Hampton, Long Island, New York.

      Need source for the below:

      With respect to the eldest son, Abraham Davie Candy was born on 26 December 1801 and named after his maternal grandfather. According to his headstone in the South End Cemetery in East Hampton, Long Island, he was born in London10. Since he left no direct offspring, this information might be wrong, although the fact that his father John was a baker means it is entirely possible that shortly after their marriage John and Mary Candy did, in fact, spend some time in London. Like his brother John, who is the founder of the Kentucky branch of the Candy family, Abraham emigrated to the United States11 and, also like John, was a teacher; indeed the earliest record we have for him in East Hampton is a newspaper advertisement in the Sag Harbor Corrector dated 11 April 1829. This refers to the forthcoming summer session at the Clinton Academy - the oldest chartered preparatory school on the island12 - “under the superintendence of A D Candy, Esq a gentleman of high Classical attainments, and long experience in teaching.”

      Although I have been unable to find out precisely when, Abraham married in about 1846 to Phebe Mulford, daughter of an established local family and widowed some years earlier by the untimely death of her first husband Ezra Miller. Abraham took a lively interest in the establishment of the Episcopalian Church in East Hampton; indeed in his will he left “The interest of one thousand [dollars] to be appropriated yearly to the support of the gospel ministry and ordinances of the Episcopal Church organisation of said town of East Hampton.”

      Abraham and Phebe did not have any children of their own; however, they did adopt one of his nieces, Laura Candy, daughter of his brother John, following the death of her mother in 1849. About 1850, Laura must have moved to Long Island from Shelbyville Kentucky, and it is recorded that she was the first organist in the newly established Episcopalian Church at East Hampton. Within a few years of her move to Long Island, however, she fell in love with Samuel H Miller, a member of an established East Hampton family some nine years her senior and, against her Uncle’s wishes, ran off and married him at Amagansett on 28 February 186015. This led to an irreconcilable breakdown with Abraham, who not only cut her out of his Will but, it is said, refused to speak to her again. “When he died in 1880, a little trunk with her clothing and music books was found in the house.”

      Abraham had a reputation for being somewhat colourful. In her book on the early history of the Maidstone Club, Rattray says; Candy himself was a very interesting character. His disposition was such that all his Clinton Academy pupils left him, with the exception of Hiram Sherrill…. ‘Sam’ Miller [husband of Laura Candy] … wrote a book called My Wife’s Uncle about Candy; but it was never published. Innumerable stories could be told of Candy. He quarrelled with B F Worthington, the wheelwright, who had built him a wagon. Candy was not satisfied and swore he wouldn’t pay for it. Worthington replied, “The Lord has made you able, and the law will make you willin’.”

      Phebe Candy died on 5 February 1873, and was buried alongside her brother, Captain Josiah Mulford in the south burying ground of East Hampton village18. The widowed Abraham lived on for a further seven years, finally dying on 9 February 1880 at the age of 78 years, 1 month and 14 days19 when, as directed in his will, he was buried “as near to my late wife Phebe as the ground will permit, the time of my death to be recorded under my name on the [brown]stone monument erected to our and her brother Josiah Mulford’s memory in the south burying ground of East Hampton village.”

      When he died, he left half of his considerable estate to four charities or memorial funds that he had set up to commemorate himself, and the other half he left to be equally divided amongst the children of his four brothers and sisters. He made absolutely no mention of his adopted daughter Laura, although he did leave $1000 and a house to his “lifelong friend and housekeeper Mary Lester.” Evidently this arrangement was unacceptable to many of his legatees, who mounted what today we could call a class action in the Suffolk County Supreme Court. The action dragged on for some eleven years, until Justice Dykman finally overturned the will in 1891, by which time a large proportion of the estate had evidently been eroded in legal fees. In reporting the case, the local newspaper commented; Mr Candy was one of those men who accumulated money and held on to it while he lived. His heirs were remote and in them he felt very little interest.

      The small charities that he proposed should immortalise his memory have become unavailable in the intricacies of the law. The moral is established, however little it may be heeded, that the best time for men of money to do good with their money is while living.
    Person ID I67702  7_families
    Last Modified 14 May 2003 

    Family Phebe Mulford,   b. 1792,   d. 5 Feb 1873  (Age 81 years) 
    Married Abt 1846  Of, East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 21 Feb 2005 
    Family ID F26542  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 26 Dec 1801 - London, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1840 U.S. - - East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1850 U.S. - - East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1860 U.S. - - East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1846 - Of, East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
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