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Ananias Conkling

Male 1594-1600 - Abt 1657  (57 years)


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  • Name Ananias Conkling 
    Born 1594-1600  , Nottinghamshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died Abt 1 Oct 1657  East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Notes 
    • From "The Conklin Family: of Staffordshire, England; Nottingham, England; Salem, Massachusetts; Southold, New York; East Hampton, New York; Dutchess County, New York; and Binghampton, New York 1630 - 1979" by Honor Conklin.

      Annanias worked as a glassmaker in King Swinford, County Stafford, England when he married Mary Lauder, a spinster of St. Peter's Parish in Nottingham, England. The marriage is recorded in that church on February 23, 1631. Their first son, Jeremiah, was born in 1634. Between 1634 and 1636 Ananias, his brother John, and their families came to America and settled in Salem, Massachusetts. It is believed that Mary Lauder died in Salem (now Peabody), although her grave has not been located. Her death was probably between 1638 and 1639 after the births of Cornelius and Benjamin but before Ananias's marriage to Susan in 1639. Ananias and John were granted house lots in Salem in June 1638. The following info taken from various books on early American glass. In 1638 Lawrence Southwick, a Quaker, and Obadiah Holmes formed a partnership to build the first glass factory in New England with Ananias and John Conkling, practical glassmakers. Each were granted land adjoining their homes for the glass house. This land was located on the original road from Salem to Boston, and is now Abbott Street, a residential section in Peabody. In the records of the Mass. Bay Colony, it says that the town of Salem lent the men 30 pounds for the factory to be repaid if the factory succeeded and when they were able. A descendent of Southwick was quoted as saying that bottles were made in light and dark green, blue, and brown glass. Also, earthenware and "bull's eyes" for windows and doors were made. No samples of the work have been positively identified.

      In 1639 Ananias married Susan, a member of the First Church of Salem. On May 18, 1642, John and Ananias were made freedmen of Salem and received more land. About that time they were also made freedmen of what is now Cambridge. In Vol II of Mass Bay Colony, under October 1645, it states that Ananias and John petitioned the General Court for a settlement with the undertakers of the factory, Holmes and Southwick. They said the works had been neglected for three years and that they had not been paid. It was at this time that Quakers were being harassed and persecuted, among them, Southwick. Ananias and John then requested a release from the agreement in order to seek work elsewhere. About 1649, Ananias and John with their families moved south and settled in Southold, New York. "Southold Town Records" December 1652 states the location of land holdings of Ananias in Southold. "Whitaker's Southold" shows a map of the holdings. In 1650, Ananias obtained an allotment of land in East Hampton. He shared teh meadow on the north side of Hook Pond with Lion Gardiner, Thomas Chatfield, and William Hedges. In February 4, 1656, Ananias and Lion were chosen as chimney inspectors. While in East Hampton, Ananias married Dorothy. Lion disapproved of the marriage of Mary to Jeremiah. He is said to have commented that the Conklings were bottlers from Nottinghamshire and that they were farmers and handymen without large estates. Ananias died in 1657 probably in East Hampton.

      He is presumed to be buried in Old South End Burial Ground but no stone has been found. From East Hampton History by Rattray. says Ananias born in Nottinghamshire about 1600. Calls wife Mary Lavender.

      A glass house was operating in the middle of the seventeenth century at Salem, Massachusetts. It appears likely that religious persecution, rather than economic failure, was the main reason why it stopped producing. Little is written about this in books on the history of the American Glass Industry, so the story below is what I have been able to piece together from many sources; principal ones include: Laura Woodside Watkins, "American Glass and Glassmaking", 1950 p22., "Aspects of Glassmaking in Eighteenth-Century America" by Arlene Palmer in the Annales of the 8th Congress AIHV, 1979 and the corrected electronic version [copyright Robert Kraft, July 1994] of "The genealogical dictionary of the first settlers to New England..." by James Savage. I would be very pleased to hear any additional information about this enterprise or the people involved, especially whether any of the glass that was apparently found on the site has survived. There had been an intention of setting up a glass house in New England for some time, since in March 1635/6 Samuel Reade wrote in a letter to his brother-in-law John Winthrop, jr, "at his father's house in Boston or elsewhere these present in New-England" that "the glass men will not undertake to goe over, till there be claye found out fitt for them in the country: least they should be a burthen to those that transport them, or elce live miserably; for they have not wherwithall to defray theire owne charges over." Clay was presumably found for, on 21st January 1639, three men from England, Ananias Concklin, Obadiah Holmes, and Lawrence Southwick, called "glass men" in records, were each granted two [one?]acres of land "adjoining to their houses" for the furtherance of a glasshouse project(with Holmes at least receiving a promise of ten more acres "to be laid out by the town"). One reference reports that Ananias Concklin had arrived in Salem the previous year, but it is probable that both Holmesand Southwick also actually arrived in 1638. Holmes at least had an extremely stormy voyage that prevented the ship from entering Boston harbour until six weeks had passed (this must have been in the summer or early fall of 1638). They were joined the following year by John Concklin, probably Ananias' brother, who was given five more acres abutting on the previous grants. This acreage was off the old Boston road (Aborn Street), in what is now Peabody. In December 1641,theGeneralCourt of the province authorized the town of Salem to lend the proprietors thirty pounds, which they were to repay "if the work succeeded when they were able." The town was authorised to deduct this sum from the next rate laid. This sum may have been for the erection of a second furnace. In 1645 Ananias Concklin with John petitioned the General Court for a settlement of their affairs with the "undertakers"(undertakers being stockholders Lawrence Southwick and Obadiah Holmes). They said that the glass works had been neglected for three years and that they had not been paid. They petitioned for are lease from their agreement so that they might seek work elsewhere. The outcome of this petition is unknown, but Ananias was still there in March1649when his third child was baptized. He, brother John and son John apparently removed to Long Island about 1650. Apparently the Conklins also complained about the lack of suitable clay for crucibles. One modern reference states that "these works were operated with more or less success for thirty years, and were finally closed in 1670for"lackof capital". Whilst it appears probable from the information discussed below that three of the four glass makers were at Salem until about 1650,it seems unlikely that any of them remained much after this, so the above date seems very questionable. For many years the site of this industry in Salem was called the "glasshouse field," and fragments of dark greenish glass were apparently found near a stone wall that once bounded the property. Laura Woodside Watkins comments that "while it seems certain that the Concklins actually blew glass, they probably achieved nothing more important than bottles". This observation is also very doubtful, since this glass-house appears to predate the use of specialised bottle glass houses in England. It is much more likely that the glasshouse at Salem produced a similar range of products to that at Haughton Green, including: vessels, bottles and broad-glass for windows. The Salem glass-house was probably wood fired, because there was a plentiful supply of suitable timber there and apparently no coal. The nearby Saugus Ironworks established with English workers in 1642 was wood (charcoal) fired. In contrast, both Haughton Green and the Kingswinford glass houses had been leaders in introducing coal firing in England. Good clay was apparently available locally along the banks of the Waters River, and this was later used for pottery. However, this may have been unsuitable for making glass pots, as claimed by the Conklins. There were also sources of glass-making sands in Massachusetts, but the high-quality ones used until recent times are a long way from Salem.
    Person ID I813148  7_families
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2006 

    Father William Conkling,   b. , , England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. , , England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Ruth Hedges,   b. , , England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. , , England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F295577  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Mary Lauder,   b. Abt 1609, St Peters Parish, Nottingham, Nottingham, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1638-1639, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years) 
    Married 26 Feb 1630  St. Peter's, Nottingham, Nottingham, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Children 
     1. John Conkling,   b. Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +2. Jeremiah Conkling,   b. 1634, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Mar 1711, East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     3. Cornelius Conkling,   b. 1636, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Mar 1668, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)
    +4. Benjamin Conkling,   b. 1638, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Feb 1708, East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     5. Lewis Conkling,   c. 30 Apr 1643, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Jacob Conkling,   c. 18 May 1649, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Elizabeth Conkling,   b. 18 May 1649, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Hester Conkling,   b. 1651, Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Feb 1717, East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2006 
    Family ID F294711  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Mrs. Susan Conkling,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2006 
    Family ID F324488  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1594-1600 - , Nottinghamshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 26 Feb 1630 - St. Peter's, Nottingham, Nottingham, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Abt 1 Oct 1657 - East Hampton, Long Island, Suffolk, New York Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
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    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S7855] Mulford's in America, a Quarterly Newsletter, Joan Black Lund, (Published by Joan Black Lund, Jun 1985 - Feb 1992.), Vol 1, Issue 4, pg 110 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S7736] A chronicle of everyday people, Catherine Marshall Gardiner, ([S.l.] : UMI; out-of-print books on demand, [199-?]. Book #929.273 G168gc), Book #929.273 G168gc., 17: Ananias Conkling died about 1 Oct 1657 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S7736] A chronicle of everyday people, Catherine Marshall Gardiner, ([S.l.] : UMI; out-of-print books on demand, [199-?]. Book #929.273 G168gc), Book #929.273 G168gc., 17: «b»Ananias Conkling«/b» married 23 Feb 1631 «b»Mary Launder «/b»at St. Peter's Church, Nottingham, England (Reliability: 3).